The Taste of Brazil


Bruno (BUZZ): When we say that Brazil is one of the largest countries in the world, we have to keep in mind that not only is this country large in terms of territory but also terms of complexity and diversity. So it would be difficult to portray only one single dish to define the food of a country as diverse as Brazil.’

Feijoada

After taking a sojourn from writing I dared to challenge myself to explore the cuisine of my country (Brazil). First I thought of talking about some dishes which have world-wide recognition, such as so-called FEIJOADA (cooked black beans with pork meat). But, I put across the following question to myself:  What defines the food of a country?

And I realized that it would be difficult to confine the answer of the question to a single dish.

When we say that Brazil is one of the largest countries in the world, we have to keep in mind that not only is this country large in terms of territory but also terms of complexity and diversity. So it would be difficult to portray only one single dish to define the food of a country as diverse as Brazil.  Do you agree?

Brazil is blessed with diversity in every aspect. It has diverse regions, different climates, and different peoples. And this very diversity provides different ingredients, different ways of cooking, and different style of feeding. Everything is present with its distinct characteristics. Sometimes the changes are perceptible even if you travel from one city to another.

So I decided to move on to another question. What is common in the Brazilian plate?

And I was surprised to learn that the common ingredient in several regions of Brazilian cuisine is Flours!!!! Though its application and uses vary from region to region as inhabitants of different regions have different tastes, yet almost every Brazilian uses this ingredient in their recipes.

Again the diversity is present irrespective of regional variation, be it the manioc flour, corn, wheat, babassu and so on.

 It is virtually omnipresent in many recipes in Brazil.

In a humid condition, it is present in the “Angu” which is favorite to the native Indians. In the form of a “pirão” (like a Fish stew with flour) it feeds the fishermen who take advantage of everything the fish can offer. And when dry accompanies dishes from north to south, including the most famous dish of our country the blessed globally acclaimed  FEIJOADA.

Pirão

Words: Bruno

Photos: Wikimedia, Guido Ferreira


About the author: Bruno is a digital marketing professional with special expertise in CRM. Brazilian backpacker, passionate about gastronomy and intense travel enthusiast. Has already traveled fourteen countries and desire to explore more. Participated in five courses/workshops focused on gastronomy including one in Italy (pasta, pizza, and sauces) in the Cordon Bleu of Firenze, Italy.

Email: boabuzzbox@gmail.com

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